The Man Who Would Make Food Obsolete

By: ROC MORIN
Posted: APR 28 2014

Rob Rhinehart invented Soylent—a beverage that he claims contains all necessary nutrients—as a food replacement. The first batch is shipping this month.

"I’m looking forward to the point where we don’t have to worry about hunger, or nutrition. Where people make food just because it’s beautiful—like gardening, or painting. I’m looking forward to the point where food can just be art."

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First sunset of the lunar year. Even on the rainiest of days, the sky will be forever blue and golden. See ya later Taiwan.

First sunset of the lunar year. Even on the rainiest of days, the sky will be forever blue and golden. See ya later Taiwan.

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New Years Celebrations still going strong at midnight here in Chiayi

New Years Celebrations still going strong at midnight here in Chiayi

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Golden Rice: Lifesaver?

ONE bright morning this month, 400 protesters smashed down the high fences surrounding a field in the Bicol region of the Philippines and uprooted the genetically modified rice plants growing inside.

Had the plants survived long enough to flower, they would have betrayed a distinctly yellow tint in the otherwise white part of the grain. That is because the rice is endowed with a gene from corn and another from a bacterium, making it the only variety in existence to produce beta carotene, the source of vitamin A. Its developers call it “Golden Rice.”
 

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When Meals Played the Muse - New York Times

Gordon Matta-Clark, right, turned this photograph into a promotion for Food, the restaurant he and other artists opened in 1971.

Caroline Goodden, a photographer and dancer who was then Matta-Clark’s girlfriend, said the idea for Food grew partly out of a floating dinner party scene that materialized in many of the cheap lofts inhabited, legally or not, by artists and performers in Lower Manhattan, including a group of Louisiana expatriates who played with Mr. Glass and cooked Cajun feasts for their friends.

At one of her parties, organized around a flower theme — edible flowers were served to guests who came dressed as flowers — Matta-Clark half-jokingly suggested that Ms. Goodden start a restaurant. She took him up on it, sinking substantial sums of her own money into it. Taking over the lease from a failed Puerto Rican restaurant, she, Matta-Clark and another downtown artist named Tina Girouard set about gutting and rebuilding the space in June 1971 with help from other friends, creating one of the few places to eat in the neighborhood at the time, besides Fanelli’s bar.

From the beginning, the idea was to establish not only a kind of perpetual dinner party but also a food-based philanthropy that would employ and support struggling artists, the whole endeavor conceived by Matta-Clark as a living, breathing, steaming, pot-clanging artwork.

“To Gordon, I think everything in life was an art event,” said Ms. Goodden, who now lives in a small town in New Mexico. “He had cooking all through his mind as a way of assembling people, like choreography. And that, in a way, is what Food became.”

Also:

The Banquet Years: FOOD, a SoHo Restaurant in the Early 1970s by Lori Waxman
http://www.as-ap.org/content/banquet-years-food-soho-restaurant-early-1970s-lori-waxman-0

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Long Awaited Lab-Grown Burger Is Unveiled In London : NPR
Rarely has a single food gotten such star treatment as the hamburger that made its debut in London on Monday. But the burger” grown from stem cells taken from a cow€” represents a technology potentially so disruptive that it has attracted the support of Google co-founder Sergei Brin.
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How supersized portions cost the earth
Over the past two decades, food waste and obesity have nearly doubled at equal rates. The link between health and environment has never been stronger..
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Medium Cool: Preserving Disorder

By Thomas Beard
Posted on May 21, 2013

“For me, as an ethnographer and filmmaker,” Jean Rouch once remarked, “there is almost no boundary between documentary film and films of fiction. The cinema, the art of the double, is already the transition from the real world to the imaginary world, and ethnography, the science of the thought systems of others, is a permanent crossing point from one conceptual universe to another; acrobatic gymnastics, where losing one’s footing is the least of the risks.”

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As Crop Prices Surge, Investment Firms and Farmers Vie for Land

A farmland auction in Buckley, Ill., this month. In neighboring Iowa, farm prices have nearly doubled since 2009.

By JULIE CRESWELL
Published: March 18, 2013

From the potato fields of Michigan to the high prairies of Kansas, farmers are receiving record prices for their land — but economists and banking regulators warn that this boom, like so many before it, could end badly.

Across the American heartland, farmland prices are soaring. In places like Waco, Neb., and Chickasaw County, Iowa, where the boom-and-bust cycle of farming reaches deep into the psyche, some families are selling the land that they have worked for generations, to cash in while they can.

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Taichung man plants trees for posterity

By Benjamin Yeh 

“It was just a simple idea I had,” Lai said. “If I was to safeguard Taiwan, I would have to plant trees.”

For the past three decades, Lai has bought and planted thousands of trees every year, often with his own hands.

Today his efforts can be seen in the 130 hectares of mountainsides near Greater Taichung covered with 270,000 deep-rooted trees, representing indigenous species such as Taiwan incense cedar and Cinnamomum micranthum.

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